CHANGE IS GOOD

I like change - but only really if it's at my liberty. I'm not an avid planner but whilst I'm definitely a "go with what feels best" type of person, I like to know what's going on, you know? Consistency. As I've gotten older, I've learned that change is seldom a bad thing. Even if it seems catastrophic in the moment, "it'll all come right in the end, sweetheart" - as my boyfriend regularly reassures me. 

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For the longest time, I've been trying to make safe changes. Only putting myself out there when I could pretty much guarantee that it would not return to bite me in the ass. Minimal risk. 

I went into certain situations, expecting a lot more than I was willing to put in and, even when I lay all of my cards on the table with only a little left in the arsenal, things still didn't go my way. Peak frustration.  I had no idea what I more I could do to yield the results I was looking for beyond this one thing that I wasn't prepared to do.

I felt trapped, smothered and claustrophobic. I'd reached a dead end which resulted in meltdown. I picked myself up, wiped my tears and carried on as usual. When I least expected it, the change that I'd be yearning for was put upon me. My hand was forced and suddenly, I had the freedom that I'd been seeking. GAME. ON.

I keep an analogue diary in the form of a bullet journal because it's not every day digital, man (*see below for BuJo inspo!). I log everything that I have planned for the month, week and day and I also write down things that've happened that day, positive or negative. At the end of each week and month, I flick through, write reviews, make a note of what I'm thankful for and lessons I've learned.

When the pressure is on, you will do everything within your power to stay afloat. I'm thankful that I have a support network that never lets me down. In the past, I've been too proud to ask for help but, after 4 weeks of phone calls, emails, meetings, interviews and project submissions, I'm on a career path that feels right for me so I wanted to share some of the things that I've learned over the last few weeks as the lessons are invaluable. I also feel that women often feel inhibited by loyalty and fear when it comes to asking what for what they want (and deserves) when it comes to careers and the work place.

1. UTILIZE YOUR CONTACTS

Over the years, I've made many connections, bonds and friendships that have been nurturing but also extremely helpful. Don't be afraid to utilize your contacts. Respect boundaries, of course, and try yourself first but it's important to remember that we all need help. No woman is an island! Whether it's a contact, information or assistance, don't be afraid to ask! You'll be surprised by how far your network can reach and who will be willing to help.

2. DON'T SELL YOURSELF SHORT

Afraid that you're giving too much detail or information? Don't be. List all of the things that you're passionate about, that you're good at and see where you can go from there. Where can your skillset be applied? Is someone missing a trick?

3. BE PERSONABLE

Whether you're selling yourself or a product, it's important to have self-awareness. Show interest and that you're knowledgable. Be engaging and don't be afraid to speak about personal experiences! No one is a machine. Our interpersonal relationships form our paths! The lessons that you learn outside of the work-place are just as informative.

When was the last time you took a leap of faith or made a major change in your life? How did you navigate it?

 

(**BULLET JOURNALLING: watch Ryder Caroll's video for comprehensive breakdown on his system! Here's another couple of videos for bullet journal inspo - Rachel Nguyen, Gemary, Kicki Zhang).